Expedition – Vaseksura http://vaseksura.com/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 12:19:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://vaseksura.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Expedition – Vaseksura http://vaseksura.com/ 32 32 Navigate Expeditions uses a Tesla Model 3 https://vaseksura.com/navigate-expeditions-uses-a-tesla-model-3/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 12:17:17 +0000 https://vaseksura.com/navigate-expeditions-uses-a-tesla-model-3/ Jessica Taunton had never owned a car as chic as a Tesla Model 3. She had only bought older used vehicles, mostly 4WD vehicles. Navigate the expeditions was a tough decision. She was only convinced after going through numerous spreadsheets designed by her partner that compared and contrasted the operating costs of several vehicles – […]]]>

Jessica Taunton had never owned a car as chic as a Tesla Model 3. She had only bought older used vehicles, mostly 4WD vehicles. Navigate the expeditions was a tough decision. She was only convinced after going through numerous spreadsheets designed by her partner that compared and contrasted the operating costs of several vehicles – new and used; electric, diesel and gasoline. The idea that this car could also be used for his new business sealed the deal. The purchase has been made.

The New South Wales (NSW) rebates were also a timely incentive, and calculations have shown that in about 7-10 years the vehicle will indeed pay for itself. The company saves over $ 200 per week in fuel costs alone. But will it be hard enough?

“Much of the driving we do for Navigate the expeditions is on a dirt road, ”Jess tells me. “This means there is a potential for crushing sticks, a lot of gravel rocks and, more recently, large puddles. We had an incident while crossing a deep puddle on a dirt road where parts of the skid plate came off. We have since replaced it with aluminum skid plates and we already feel a lot more confident when driving on dirt roads.

Jess leads the Navigate Expeditions team. She is responsible for overseeing all operations. She has worked as a photo guide, managed one of Australia’s most luxurious all-inclusive lodges – Swell Lodge on Christmas Island, and sailed the Northwest Passage on a 29-foot junk.

Kanga. photo by Jessica taunton, courtesy of Navigate Expeditions.

With qualifications and experience in rock climbing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, rappelling, mountain biking and other outdoor activities, Jess brings to Navigate Expeditions a wealth of knowledge and expertise. experience in guiding and outdoor tourism. She loves nothing more than being in nature, meeting like-minded people and eating white chocolate.

Kanga and Joey in pouch. photo by Jessica Taunton, courtesy of Navigate Expeditions.

All of the Navigate Expeditions guests were impressed with the Tesla. It is a novelty to find a luxury electric vehicle used for tours. But once they take a tour and hear about all the practicalities, they begin to understand that it’s super convenient, efficient, convenient, and comfortable. It’s a good fit with ecotourism on many levels.

“My partner and I both hate the smell of the gas station, and of course during times of COVID we wanted to avoid frequently touched surfaces and frequently visited places. We charged at home, overnight, off-peak when needed, or we drive 15 minutes to our nearest compressor which is supplied by NRMA and is free at the moment. While we wait for the recharge, we do our shopping. Jess said.

Personally, “During COVID, we enjoyed many dates in the Tesla, ranging from driving to a gazebo and watching the rippling ocean with the fireplace screen displayed, even getting comfortable in the loot and to watch a movie while looking at the stars above us in the glass roof, ” Jess confides – ah, romance fashion!

Swag in Tesla. Photo by Jessica Taunton, courtesy of Navigate Expeditions.

“As I was leading a tour of Ben Boyd National Park, a guest was traveling with me in the Tesla and two other vehicles were following me. These guests wished to travel in their own vehicles for logistical reasons. Towards the end of the day, when we started to make our way to our accommodation for the evening, the Cape Green Lighthouse Cottages inside Ben Boyd National Park, the other two vehicles had to refuel before the ride. from a distance. This meant they had to back up to the nearest gas station, so they got to the accommodation about 40 minutes behind. We were able to drive straight away, as I had charged the Tesla 90% the day before. On our way we saw a lyre bird that didn’t seem to bother us at all when we stopped to try and take a photo, a bandicoot, and when we got to the accommodation we saw a spectacular whale show at bump. The other guests who arrived 40 minutes after us didn’t see any wildlife on the road and missed the best of the humpback whale show, all because they had to turn around to refuel. vehicle.

Whale tale. photo by Jessica Taunton, courtesy of Navigate Expeditions.

Jess uses the Tesla for private tours for 1 to 3 people on the Sapphire Coast, NSW. If it has larger groups of guests, it uses a combination of a Toyota Troop Carrier, an 11-seater for short off-road trips, or a 12-seater Toyota minibus. In the future, she would like to invest in a 12-seater electric vehicle. However, due to the remoteness of the location, it would need a long-range vehicle like the Tesla Model 3 that can go up to 500 km (311 miles).

Jess works full time at her business and has two occasional guides. E-mail jess@NavigateExpeditions.com for job applications.

His partner also helps. He frequently uses the vehicle for camping trips. He loves to go alone in the bush. He loves that the loot fits into the back of the Tesla, and there’s nothing better than staring at the stars through the glass roof at night before falling asleep.

Cleaning was of course a problem. Jess finds a Dyson flexible extension hose – super handy for cleaning hard-to-reach places! The armrest storage tray is ideal for pens and coins.

She recommends all-weather floor mats, trunk mats and trunk mats. These have been fantastic and saved them a lot of time vacuuming and cleaning. Due to the nature of their tours, their guests invariably re-enter the vehicle with dirty and muddy feet. She used to spend a lot of time vacuuming the standard floor mats, but now all she has to do is take out the rugs, shake them up (wipe or hose if necessary) and put them back on.

Next on the list is the Door Seal Kit to keep dirt from dirt roads from sitting on the edges of the doors’, she adds.

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Alabama researchers move closer to the site of a crucial battle https://vaseksura.com/alabama-researchers-move-closer-to-the-site-of-a-crucial-battle/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 18:12:07 +0000 https://vaseksura.com/alabama-researchers-move-closer-to-the-site-of-a-crucial-battle/ For a century, researchers have sought the spot where the Spanish explorers of Hernando de Soto clashed with the warriors of Chief Tascalusa in a devastating battle that changed the course of history in the South. Spanish survivors wrote about the Battle of Mabila in documents that survived the doomed expedition. But historians and archaeologists […]]]>

For a century, researchers have sought the spot where the Spanish explorers of Hernando de Soto clashed with the warriors of Chief Tascalusa in a devastating battle that changed the course of history in the South.

Spanish survivors wrote about the Battle of Mabila in documents that survived the doomed expedition. But historians and archaeologists have never found the exact location of the confrontation that killed hundreds of Spaniards and thousands of Native Americans.

Archaeologist Ashley Dumas, a professor at the University of West Alabama, has announced the discovery of Spanish and Native American artifacts at several sites in Marengo County, located between Montgomery and the Mississippi border. The newly identified settlements are now believed to be Mabila Province.

Although the exact site of the battle has still not been located, Dumas said the findings suggest it likely occurred a few miles from the territory identified by his team.

“It has been a really fascinating puzzle trying to solve using multiple sources of evidence and multiple types of expertise,” said Dumas.

The Battle of Mabila played a key role in shaping the culture of the South, Dumas said. De Soto led hundreds of men on an expedition across the region in search of treasure and land to settle. In Mabila, they lost their treasure and supplies and encountered fierce resistance from native warriors who turned them to the north into more inhospitable terrain. The few who survived the trip eventually made it to Mexico with nothing to show for their efforts.

“It was a dramatic event and it marked a major turning point in southeastern European colonization,” Dumas said. “The Battle of Mabila is the reason we don’t speak Spanish in the South East today. “

The Battle of Mabila was the Gettysburg of its day, said Jim Knight, a retired anthropology professor at the University of Alabama. Generations of historians and archaeologists have researched the site of the battle, described as a walled city.

Over time, two camps have formed. Mabila was believed to be in southwestern Alabama. The other placed the site in central Alabama. Steven Meredith is an archaeologist who joined Mabila’s research in 2019.

“It’s hard to be an archaeologist in Alabama without having an opinion on it,” Meredith said.

To find it, the researchers began with accounts of the expedition in four chronicles that survived the trip. They tried to identify the geographic locations where crucial events occurred. Charles Hudson, historian and anthropologist in Georgia, created a map of de Soto’s route that remains widely accepted, Dumas said.

Archaeologists have used this information, which could be vague and contradictory, for decades to search for sites without success. Several federal and state commissions dating back to the 1930s sent research teams to central and southern Alabama, only to see them return empty-handed.

In 2005, Knight helped organize a new panel of experts to take a fresh look at the evidence. The panel consisted of a wide range of historians, archaeologists, geographers, geologists and folklorists. Neither had close ties to the two camps that had staked their claims to locations in southern or central Alabama.

The group had to answer a key question that seemed to rule out southern Alabama: How many miles could the group travel each day?

“A big mistake people made was deciding that the wait could go 25 to 26 miles a day given that they had a herd of pigs and burden carriers chained to their necks,” Knight said.

The new group estimated that the expedition could cover about 12 miles per day and focused on areas of the river valleys that had traditionally been settled by Mississippi tribes. Knight and other researchers examined three potential sites where Native American artifacts were found but written off.

Knight said he almost gave up when a geographer friend from North Carolina urged him to make a last ditch effort. Instead of looking at river valleys, the new research turned to black belt grasslands.

His team included many other researchers, including Charles Cobb, a Spanish metal expert at the Florida Museum of Natural History, and Tony Boudreaux, an archaeologist at Mississippi State University, specializing in contact between Native Americans and early explorers. Volunteers and students also participated in the surveys.

Dumas and her husband began by surveying the plowed fields. The soil in this part of the black belt is difficult to find, and private pine plantations cover much of the land. In the fields, they found shards of pottery.

Then they discovered pieces of metal that dated back to the time of Spanish exploration.

“I never had chills and tears in my eyes like I did when we found that unmistakable 16th century first piece of metal,” said Dumas. “And then we found more and more. And we are up to 52 pieces confirmed.

Researchers are still looking for the exact site of the battle, a walled city that burned down after the clash. Chief Tascalusa’s forces lost the battle but pulled heavy losses from the Spaniards. In Spanish chronicles, Tascalusa was described as a giant and eventually his name would be used for the town of Tuscaloosa. The discovery of the settlements considered to be the chiefdom of Tascalusa led to new understandings of Native American culture during the time of de Soto’s expedition.

“We are now certain that we have Mabila province,” Dumas said.

Meredith said the discovery could help expand knowledge about life in 16th century Alabama, when early explorers caused great disruption in Native American society. The settlement of Mabila probably lasted only a few generations and represented a period of great transition.

“If there was ever a dramatic time for Alabama, the 16th century was one of them,” Meredith said, “It was a time of tremendous change. “

Dumas said private landowners in Marengo County played a key role in helping his team make his discoveries. Sometimes fears that investigations would disrupt agriculture and business have made it difficult to find artifacts, she said. His team made sure to work with the owners and protect the exact locations of key sites. Researchers will also work with Native American tribes on efforts to repatriate some artifacts.

The exact location of the Battle of Mabila could be at hand. Or it could be lost in time, covered with pine trees, or hidden by development. If research continues, archaeologists will continue to learn more about Indigenous cultures before and after de Soto.

“Even though we don’t understand this point of origin, and maybe it’s a big catfish pond, we have a better picture of the society at this time,” Meredith said.


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Pixel-art deck-building roguelike Loop Hero launches on Nintendo Switch eShop on December 9 https://vaseksura.com/pixel-art-deck-building-roguelike-loop-hero-launches-on-nintendo-switch-eshop-on-december-9/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 15:35:44 +0000 https://vaseksura.com/pixel-art-deck-building-roguelike-loop-hero-launches-on-nintendo-switch-eshop-on-december-9/ Publisher Devolver Digital and developer Four Quarters announced that Loop hero will be launched for Nintendo Switch online store December 9. The pixel-art deck-building roguelike will be priced at $ 14.99, with a 10% discount for those who pre-purchase. Loop Hero initially released for PC in March 2021, and it sold 500,000 copies in its […]]]>

Publisher Devolver Digital and developer Four Quarters announced that Loop hero will be launched for Nintendo Switch online store December 9. The pixel-art deck-building roguelike will be priced at $ 14.99, with a 10% discount for those who pre-purchase.

Loop Hero initially released for PC in March 2021, and it sold 500,000 copies in its first week on sale.

A new trailer and description of the game can be found below.

The Lich has thrown the world into a timeless loop and plunged its inhabitants into endless chaos.

Manipulate an expanding mystical card game to place enemies, buildings, and land along each unique expedition loop for the brave hero. Collect and equip powerful loot for each hero class for their battles, and expand the survivor camp to strengthen each adventure throughout the loop. Unlock new classes, cards, perks, and devious guardians on your quest to break the never-ending cycle of despair.

  • Infinite Adventure: Choose from character classes and deck cards to unlock before embarking on each expedition along a randomly generated looping path. No expedition is ever the same as the previous ones.
  • Plan your fight: Strategically place construction, terrain, and enemy maps along each loop to create your own dangerous path. Find a balance between the maps to increase your chances of survival while collecting valuable loot and resources for your side.
  • Loot and Upgrade: Take down menacing creatures, collect more powerful loot to equip on the fly, and unlock new perks along the way.
  • Expand your camp: Turn hard-earned resources into camping upgrades, and gain valuable reinforcements with every completed loop along the way of the expedition.
  • Save the lost world: Overcome a series of unholy guardian bosses in a grand saga to save the world and break the Lich’s time loop!

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The names of the monuments of Bedaux could be deleted due to Nazi links https://vaseksura.com/the-names-of-the-monuments-of-bedaux-could-be-deleted-due-to-nazi-links/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 21:25:04 +0000 https://vaseksura.com/the-names-of-the-monuments-of-bedaux-could-be-deleted-due-to-nazi-links/ Mount Bedaux and the Bedaux Pass in northeastern British Columbia may soon see their names removed from the map due to concerns about local monuments commemorating an accused war criminal. Both sites are located at the source of the Muskwa River in Kwadacha Wilderness Provincial Park and are named after Franco-American industrialist Charles Bedaux, who […]]]>

Mount Bedaux and the Bedaux Pass in northeastern British Columbia may soon see their names removed from the map due to concerns about local monuments commemorating an accused war criminal.

Both sites are located at the source of the Muskwa River in Kwadacha Wilderness Provincial Park and are named after Franco-American industrialist Charles Bedaux, who in 1934 led an infamous subarctic expedition through the region.

Bedaux, however, was later arrested for treason by the United States during World War II, accused of aligning his business and conspiratorial interests with Nazi Germany and Nazi-occupied France. He committed suicide in 1944 in a Florida prison while awaiting trial.

The BC Geographical Names Office is now considering revoking the names of both sites following a request from a resident of British Columbia who considers them inappropriate, and is seeking comments from the Peace River Regional District, communities of the First Nations and mountain clubs.

“Before making any naming decision, it is important to determine whether the decision would support or conflict with the heritage values ​​of the area,” provincial toponymist Carla Jack wrote in a Nov. 4 letter to PRRD. “The request currently under consideration is to cancel both names and does not include name replacement at this time.”

Bedaux is important to the history of the region, having arrived from Edmonton in the summer of 1934 and employing many well-known pioneer cowboys and packers on his so-called “Champagne Safari” to open a route from Fort St. John at Telegraph Creek.

More than 100 people took part in the trip, including a film crew, documenting the Citroën half-track convoy through the rugged and unexplored terrain of the north. Bedaux’s quest was ultimately unsuccessful, as the expedition abandoned its efforts later that fall due to bad weather and poor planning.

The names of Mount Bedaux and Col Bedaux were first recorded by British Columbia land surveyor Frank Swannell, who was appointed by the government to accompany the expedition. Col de Bedaux was officially adopted as a place name on November 30, 1944 and Mont Bedaux on April 7, 1949.

“The Bedaux expedition of 1934 made its leader one of the most flamboyant explorers in Canadian history: champagne, caviar, mistress and maid; over-equipped, ill-equipped and strewn with staged incidents, directed by Hollywood cinematographer Floyd Crosby, ”reads the BC Geographical Names website. “Bedaux was convinced his group could pinpoint a route and drive a fleet of cars from Edmonton through the unmapped north of the Rocky Mountain Divide, from there through Telegraph Creek to Alaska, a distance of 2,400 km. . ”

Fort St. John North Peace Museum curator Heather Sjoblom says the expedition has always contributed to the region’s history despite the failure of Bedaux’s expedition and its subsequent ties to the Nazis and the powers of the Axis during World War II. The expedition took place before the monumental Alaska Highway construction undertaking in 1942.

“He’s really made a difference in this area, but maybe in some ways it would be better to name them after someone from around the corner who is potentially more worthy,” Sjoblom said. “Charles Bedaux’s expedition here in 1934 drew a ton of attention to the area and really made a difference for the average people who lived here in the midst of the Great Depression, who were struggling to get out of it. ”

If Bedaux’s name is removed from landmarks, they will no longer be labeled on maps of British Columbia or distributed as an official place name in the province, Jack noted in his letter to PRRD. However, the provincial records would “forever include the history” they once commemorated him, Jack noted.

“Until a widely supported naming proposal is presented and officially adopted,” wrote Jack, “references to each of these features will likely be in relation to features named nearby or by GPS coordinates, depending on needs.”

The BC Geographical Names website notes that the Sekani name for Bedaux Pass is Dawunèska, with the origin and meaning of the name currently unknown.

The regional district council meets on Thursday.

tsummer@ahnfsj.ca


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ISS welcomes new crew members with the arrival of SpaceX Crew-3 https://vaseksura.com/iss-welcomes-new-crew-members-with-the-arrival-of-spacex-crew-3/ https://vaseksura.com/iss-welcomes-new-crew-members-with-the-arrival-of-spacex-crew-3/#respond Fri, 12 Nov 2021 11:03:40 +0000 https://vaseksura.com/iss-welcomes-new-crew-members-with-the-arrival-of-spacex-crew-3/ Yesterday we mentioned that SpaceX and NASA have finally successfully launched the Crew-3 mission, sending four new astronauts to live on the ISS. The successful launch came after several delays due to weather and other issues. Crew-3 was supposed to have launched on October 31, and it was then delayed until November 3 before finally […]]]>

Yesterday we mentioned that SpaceX and NASA have finally successfully launched the Crew-3 mission, sending four new astronauts to live on the ISS. The successful launch came after several delays due to weather and other issues. Crew-3 was supposed to have launched on October 31, and it was then delayed until November 3 before finally being launched on November 10. Crew-3 finally docked with the ISS 30 minutes earlier than expected on Thursday, November 11 at 6:32 p.m. .

Docking has occurred less than 24 hours after launch from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. On board the Crew Dragon Endurance spacecraft were Raja Chari, Tom Marshburn, NASA’s Kayla Barron and ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer. According to NASA, the Endurance hatch was opened at 8:25 p.m. and the welcoming ceremony with the rest of the Expedition 66 crew took place at 9:00 p.m.

The photo above was taken during the welcome ceremony. On board the ISS when the Crew-3 astronauts arrived were Mark Vande Hei, Anton Shkaplerov (Commander of Expedition 66) and Pyotr Dubrovnik. The arrival of the astronauts at the ISS marks the third crew rotation mission conducted by SpaceX. Expedition 66 continues until April 2022.

With the multiple delays in the launch of Crew-3, NASA decided to bring the Crew-2 astronauts back to Earth using the Crew Dragon that put them into orbit. Crew-2 astronauts landed in the Gulf of Mexico near Pensacola, Florida, with no problem. Crew-2 launched on April 23, 2021, docking with the ISS on April 24, 2021. Crew-2 carried NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough, NASA astronaut Megan McArthur, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Thomas Pesquet.

A notable highlight of the Crew-2 mission was a spacewalk conducted by Hoshide and Pesquet, which was the first spacewalk conducted on the ISS without the participation of an American or Russian. The biggest issue that kept Crew-3 from launching in October or early November was the weather.

One of the astronauts aboard Crew-3 also had an undisclosed medical condition described as minor. This issue was resolved before the flight could be initiated. NASA was forced to abandon the Crew-3 launch opportunities on November 6-7. Adverse weather conditions were NASA’s main concern in both cases, including high winds at take-off and clouds. The weather is worrying on November 7 at launch abandonment sites on the east coast of the United States.

One of the strangest issues that NASA and SpaceX have faced in recent memory is the toilet design flaws onboard the Crew Dragon capsule. These defects were first observed during the Inspiration4 mission which put civilian astronauts into orbit for several days. These astronauts relied on the toilet aboard the Crew Dragon capsule more than on any past mission.

During the flight, alarms sounded on board the capsule, noting a problem with the toilet. The problem had to do with a tube that directed liquid waste into a detaching holding tank. The displaced tube allowed liquid waste to enter the fans used to create negative pressure in the system. Ultimately, the liquid waste ended up under the floor panels of the Crew Dragon spacecraft.

While the trash leaks had no impact on the crew, it was confirmed by SpaceX engineers when the capsule returned to Earth. The problem required an overhaul and approval from NASA. SpaceX welded the tube in place. However, the Crew Dragon capsule that brought Crew-2 astronauts back to Earth did not have the fix in place, and the astronauts were not allowed to use the restroom. Instead, they were given diapers for the flight home.


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Fort Clatsop exhibit honors 50th anniversary of Green Beret Expedition | Outside https://vaseksura.com/fort-clatsop-exhibit-honors-50th-anniversary-of-green-beret-expedition-outside/ https://vaseksura.com/fort-clatsop-exhibit-honors-50th-anniversary-of-green-beret-expedition-outside/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://vaseksura.com/fort-clatsop-exhibit-honors-50th-anniversary-of-green-beret-expedition-outside/ ASTORIA – Lewis and Clark National Historic Park will launch a new temporary exhibit in honor of Veterans Day in the Visitor Center exhibit hall. “Men of Many Capabilities” commemorates the 50th anniversary of when US Army Special Forces, also known as the Green Berets, retraced the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Twenty-two […]]]>

ASTORIA – Lewis and Clark National Historic Park will launch a new temporary exhibit in honor of Veterans Day in the Visitor Center exhibit hall.

“Men of Many Capabilities” commemorates the 50th anniversary of when US Army Special Forces, also known as the Green Berets, retraced the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Twenty-two men from Fort Bragg’s 5th and 7th Special Forces Groups participated in the 1971 expedition. The exhibit is open until December 11 during regular hours at Fort Clatsop.

The 1971 expedition was only the second US military expedition across North America, the first since Lewis and Clark’s voyage.

All of the men had recently returned from service in Vietnam, where the United States was still actively engaged in combat. Although officially a training exercise, the Green Berets tracing the Lewis and Clark Expedition also served as an important source of goodwill ambassador in a time of growing dissolution due to the US military intervention in Vietnam. .

The exhibition features original details and objects from the expedition. A matching game for children is also available. Military veterans are encouraged to share their thoughts on teamwork and leadership during their years of service on comment cards at the exhibit.


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A great Canadian expedition almost north-south ends »Explorersweb https://vaseksura.com/a-great-canadian-expedition-almost-north-south-ends-explorersweb/ https://vaseksura.com/a-great-canadian-expedition-almost-north-south-ends-explorersweb/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 23:04:08 +0000 https://vaseksura.com/a-great-canadian-expedition-almost-north-south-ends-explorersweb/ After nearly eight months and 7,600 km, Guillaume Moreau and Nicolas Roulx have completed their epic multidisciplinary expedition from northern Ellesmere Island to Point Pelee National Park in southern Ontario, near the border. Canadian-American. Their nearly north-south project may be the longest wilderness expedition in Canada since Knud Rasmussen’s fifth 30,000 km Thule Expedition in […]]]>

After nearly eight months and 7,600 km, Guillaume Moreau and Nicolas Roulx have completed their epic multidisciplinary expedition from northern Ellesmere Island to Point Pelee National Park in southern Ontario, near the border. Canadian-American.

Their nearly north-south project may be the longest wilderness expedition in Canada since Knud Rasmussen’s fifth 30,000 km Thule Expedition in 1921-24. The Moreau and Roulx course consisted of two ski sections totaling 1,450 km, two canoe sections totaling 2,000 km and a final 4,150 km race to the south-east by bike.

Team progress is marked with black pins and the red line shows their original route plan. The map has stopped updating in Sault Ste. Marie a few days ago, but the team has now reached its end point in Point Pelee National Park. Photo: AKOR Expedition

Along with their friend Jacob Racine, Roulx and Moreau opened the expedition on March 19 with an 800 km run from Eureka weather station on Ellesmere Island to Resolute. They suffered polar rashes, knee injuries and long periods of zero visibility while traveling 20 km per day.

Almost North-South

Although they initially billed the expedition as a complete vertical crossing of Canada, the additional cost of $ 30,000 to fly to Cape Aldrich, north of Ellesmere Island, forced them to settle for ‘a route almost north of about 680 km.

From Resolute, the trio had to further re-evaluate their route to Gjoa Haven. Barrow Strait, the channel between Cornwallis Island, on which Resolute is located, and Somerset Island, had broken. It was now mostly open water. Rather than risk the crossing, they chartered a plane to fly them 80 km over the gap to the safe ice next to Somerset Island.

The start of their journey, in the great cold of mid-March, was particularly demanding. Photo: AKOR Expedition

After having completed the 80 km, Moreau, Roulx and Racine still had 600 km to ski. The spring ice was much better than further north, offering superior glide and allowing for a few days of 30 km.

At Gjoa Haven, Racine left the team as planned and Philippe Voghel-Robert and Etienne Desbois joined Moreau and Roulx for the 700 km canoe trip inland to Baker Lake. Their ski trip from northern Ellesmere had been physically and mentally exhausting. Moreau and Roulx were delighted to switch to their main discipline, canoeing. But first, they had to reach the thawing streams.

Canoeing

Originally, they planned to travel up the Back River to the heart of Canada. However, the cold spring and the onset of cool summer meant that rivers and lakes were just starting to break apart.

Skiing on the river in the event of a break would be too dangerous. Instead, they headed further west, using a network of smaller rivers and lakes to progress. Switching the canoes from ice to water and back again, sometimes several times a day, was a punishment for both the team and the canoes.

Switching to canoes didn’t necessarily mean less handling. Photo: AKOR Expedition

Finally, by mid-July, the lakes had melted and the last leg of their trip to Baker Lake could be done in a more traditional way. But perhaps the transport of the canoe has taken its toll beyond the physical. Unexpectedly, Voghel-Robert left the expedition at Baker Lake. Catherine Chagnon, Moreau’s girlfriend, stepped in to fill the void, and the expedition continued south, originally to Black Lake.

Wind, wind, wind

This section involved a lot of paddling uphill, but it was the horrible weather that derailed them. “There was a lot of hauling but the rivers went well,” explained Moreau, “but every time we were on a large lake, we were facing the wind. It was not difficult to paddle, it was impossible.

They were only able to paddle 10 of their first 18 days after Baker Lake. For the other eight days, they closed the hatches and hid from the elements. The appalling conditions necessitated an emergency food pickup from a lodge on Lake Kasba and another major rerouting. To get back to Black Lake from Kasba Lake, they should have gone north and west, adding many more miles. Instead, they headed straight south on a “very crappy line.”

Despite the difficult canoe sections, at the end of September they took their first route of the entire expedition and switched to bicycles. Isabella Donati-Simons and Béatrice Lafrenière joined them for the last round. They traveled the last 4,150 kilometers and arrived at Point Pelee National Park in southern Ontario on November 8.

“We went to soak our feet in Lake Erie, at the end of the sand point that represents the southern end of Canada,” they said. In the end, it took them 234 days, or seven and a half months.

Moreau and Roulx have known each season, starting in early spring and ending in early winter. Photo: AKOR Expedition

The extent of the Moreau and Roulx route is astounding. An epic venture from the frozen north through vast expanses of Canadian wilderness to near the US border, every stop on their journey would be an awe-inspiring self-guided expedition. Together we have a strong contender for the most impressive expedition of 2021.

About the Author

Martin walsh

Martin walsh

Martin Walsh is a freelance writer and wildlife photographer based in Da Lat, Vietnam.

A graduate in history from the University of Nottingham, Martin’s career arc is something of a smörgåsbord. A largely unsuccessful basketball coach in Zimbabwe and the Indian Himalayas, a reluctant business lobbyist in London, and an interior design project manager in Saigon.

He had the chance to see part of the world. Highlights include tracking tigers on foot in Nepal, whitewater rafting on the Nile, blasting your way from London to Istanbul on a bicycle, feeding wild hyenas with its face in Ethiopia, and accidentally interviewing Hezbollah in Lebanon.

His areas of expertise include adventure travel, hiking, wildlife, and half-forgotten indie rock bands from the early 2000s.


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Chinese federation man calls for shipment to approve Sinovac recall https://vaseksura.com/chinese-federation-man-calls-for-shipment-to-approve-sinovac-recall/ https://vaseksura.com/chinese-federation-man-calls-for-shipment-to-approve-sinovac-recall/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://vaseksura.com/chinese-federation-man-calls-for-shipment-to-approve-sinovac-recall/ Aaron Tay Kok Tung KUCHING (November 7): Malaysia’s Ministry of Health and Drug Control Authority (DCA) are expected to consider speeding up conditional approval of the Sinovac Covid-19 vaccine for use as booster shots. The treasurer of the Chinese associations (youth section) of the Federation of Kuching, Samarahan and Serian divisions, Aaron Tay Kok Tung, […]]]>

Aaron Tay Kok Tung

KUCHING (November 7): Malaysia’s Ministry of Health and Drug Control Authority (DCA) are expected to consider speeding up conditional approval of the Sinovac Covid-19 vaccine for use as booster shots.

The treasurer of the Chinese associations (youth section) of the Federation of Kuching, Samarahan and Serian divisions, Aaron Tay Kok Tung, hailed Sarawak as the first state to administer the booster dose of the Covid-19 vaccine – an exercise that has started on October 13, giving priority to doctors and doctors. frontliners, as well as those over the age of 60.

“Sarawak has actively implemented the booster dose program where some of the under 60s received their third dose appointments.

“However, there are those who were inoculated with the Sinovac vaccines for their first two doses, who are reluctant to get the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine as a booster dose, as part of the ‘mix-and-match’ approach. “

“They prefer to postpone their vaccination appointment until the government has approved the use of Sinovac as a booster injection,” he said in a statement yesterday.

Tay said that Pharmaniaga Bhd recently offered the Sinovac vaccines to the Ministry of Health to welcome those who prefer to take this brand as a booster vaccine.

Therefore, he said the ministry should look into the matter seriously and then speed up the approval process.

He said Local Government and State Housing Minister Dato Sri Dr Sim Kui Hian through his social media post said that Sarawak currently has 140 000 doses of Sinovac vaccine available in a refrigerated warehouse.

“These vaccines could be used as booster shots once approved for use,” Tay said.

He stressed the need to ensure more people receive the booster dose to help curb the spread of Covid-19 and reduce the number of deaths from the virus, especially with the announcement of the elections in the state of Sarawak at any time. soon.

“We want to ensure the health and safety of everyone, especially voters.
“To date, some countries like China, Turkey, Chile, Indonesia and Cambodia have approved the use of Sinovac as a booster vaccine, proving that it is safe,” Tay added.








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Young people will save the planet, activist says https://vaseksura.com/young-people-will-save-the-planet-activist-says/ https://vaseksura.com/young-people-will-save-the-planet-activist-says/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 20:06:01 +0000 https://vaseksura.com/young-people-will-save-the-planet-activist-says/ “The changes induced by climate change are more intense and more visible at the poles,” said Marios Giannakou, who took part in an arctic expedition to the North Cape, Europe’s northernmost border, last summer. On the day the massive forest fire started in Varybobi, north of Athens, in early August, Marios Giannakou was on an […]]]>

“The changes induced by climate change are more intense and more visible at the poles,” said Marios Giannakou, who took part in an arctic expedition to the North Cape, Europe’s northernmost border, last summer.

On the day the massive forest fire started in Varybobi, north of Athens, in early August, Marios Giannakou was on an expedition to the Arctic Circle, exploring the Norwegian fjords in a sailboat.

The “Up In The Arctic” expedition reached the North Cape, the northernmost border of Europe. “We had some cell service, so I was able to read the news, but we had no internet coverage for the next week.

In the Arctic, “we experienced something of what the people here in Greece were experiencing, albeit in a different way. We were on the bridge when we saw a massive section of a glacier, as tall as a six-story apartment building, peel off and collapse into the sea. It’s a scene I will never forget. never. The changes induced by climate change are more intense and more visible at the poles compared to areas closer to the equator. They occur three times faster, according to scientists.

I look at Giannakou’s face on my computer screen and see a young man in his early thirties who definitely stands out from the crowd. During his first year as a student of German literature at the University of Thessaloniki, he went from an overweight chain smoker to an ultramarathon runner in a matter of months, running hundreds of kilometers at a time on the ice, in the jungle and desert.

But beyond this tremendous achievement, he also embodies the sensitivity of many men and women of his generation and younger generations for the environment, and their desire to adopt a different way of life, respectful of the planet and its people. human and animal occupants. It is telling that one of the biggest challenges he faced, in October 2020, was carrying Eleftheriou Tosiou, a 22-year-old quadriplegic college student who dreamed of climbing Mount Olympus, to its peak on his back.

Our interview could not take place in person after his return from the expedition, Giannakou having returned directly to his home in Thessaloniki, where he runs an advertising agency. Born (in 1992) and raised in the northern town of Drama and with roots in a nearby mountain village, he learned to love nature from an early age from his grandmother, who loved long walks and hikes, and his parents, who took him on excursions to the many beautiful sites in the region.

But running around places like Rovaniemi in Lapland and the Al Marmoom Desert Conservation Reserve in the United Arab Emirates has whetted his appetite for exploring wild landscapes. And his last excursion? “The trip to Norway was aimed at recording some of the problems associated with climate change and marine pollution. We traveled 1,722 kilometers in a month, spending all the time on the boat. We also want to produce a documentary that will make young people even more aware of environmental protection, ”he says.

“The trip was a revelation about what is happening in the Arctic Circle and the impact of rising temperatures on the landscape, flora and fauna. You see the harsher side of climate change here, with glaciers shrinking or disappearing altogether. This is where you realize that if we don’t take drastic action, our children will be faced with situations that we can hardly imagine right now. It’s the same with animals. We have seen polar bears and beluga whales, species adapted to arctic conditions, struggling with rapid change, ”says Giannakou.

“What I want to say after this experience, to convey something that I saw with my own eyes, is that the problem is no longer at our doorstep; it is with us. I think that as humans we have done more harm than good to our planet. On the other hand, I see a ray of light in the consciousness that my generation seems to have of the climate and of pollution, ”he adds.

I couldn’t help but play devil’s advocate and ask him how he expects today’s young Greeks to prioritize the environment as so many people struggle to find decent work after a decade-long crisis and an ongoing pandemic. My pessimism does nothing to curb his optimism.

“As a long-distance runner, I can tell you that life is an ultramarathon. You will face injuries, bad times, obstacles, exhaustion, cold feet. But there is nothing else to do but keep going, getting stronger and stronger through each ordeal. These are the facts and they will not change. So instead of complaining, let’s see what we can do instead of waiting for solutions from others, ”he says.

“We need to focus on the solution rather than the problem; we have to rely on our own potential, however small it may seem. At least that’s what I do.

The ‘click’

His life is certainly a good example of this philosophy. Before deciding to register for his first big race, he was overweight and smoked three packs a day. But he was motivated to change by the ordeal of a friend with a serious health problem. Instead of heading to his local gym, he discovered cross-country running and continued to enjoy pushing his body to its limits in extreme conditions. Now, he is one of 14 people in the world to have completed the 150km Arctic Circle winter race in February 2018 and one of 18 to cross the finish line of the Al Marmoom 270km ultramarathon la same year – and he holds the world record for the oldest desert. ultramarathoner for this effort. Last year, meanwhile, he ran 230 kilometers in the Coastal Challenge in Costa Rica and also broke the age record in the 170K Rodopi Ultra Trail in northern Greece. And, as he completely changed his life, his friend, Alexandros, recovered.

“It may sound contradictory, but I find the long distance running very relaxing. It makes me happy and balanced. Just to debunk a myth that may exist about sports, I feel like I’m doing the same thing as someone who finds their inner balance by reading or painting. Or, as the saying goes, every journey begins with the first step – all we have to do is do it, ”Giannakou emphasizes.

But where does he find the strength to continue after this first step?

“Anything that feels good for our body and soul and brings out a better version of ourselves can motivate our determination to go further – as long as we don’t give up at the beginning, when it’s difficult. For example, I don’t always run or train. I can even gain weight from time to time. But I start over, believing that if I’ve done it once, I can do it again.

Giannakou’s most inspiring accomplishment has been helping Eleftheria Tosiou fulfill her dream of climbing Mount Olympus by carrying her on her back, in a specially modified backpack.

Tosiou is also from Drama and shared his desire to see the mountain during a chance encounter one day. He organized it all and made it possible.

“Eleftheria was so happy! As soon as we reached the top she asked me to do a 360 degree turn so she could see the view. I think nothing is more wonderful than that. No medal in any race can give you so much joy.


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Korean app-based startups perform well in shipping to Asian markets https://vaseksura.com/korean-app-based-startups-perform-well-in-shipping-to-asian-markets/ https://vaseksura.com/korean-app-based-startups-perform-well-in-shipping-to-asian-markets/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 04:13:55 +0000 https://vaseksura.com/korean-app-based-startups-perform-well-in-shipping-to-asian-markets/ 확대 South Korean application-based innovation startups are making rapid strides in foraying overseas in line with the global attention Korean content has gained through the success of “Squid Game” and others. Dable, a Korea-based global content discovery platform, has risen to number one in the digital media industry in Taiwan, Indonesia and Vietnam, according to […]]]>

확대

South Korean application-based innovation startups are making rapid strides in foraying overseas in line with the global attention Korean content has gained through the success of “Squid Game” and others.

Dable, a Korea-based global content discovery platform, has risen to number one in the digital media industry in Taiwan, Indonesia and Vietnam, according to data from the startup support agency managed by the Korean government Born2Global.

Founded in 2015, Dable serves as a platform connecting advertisers and media companies using its cutting edge big data processing and machine learning technology. Last year, the company’s revenue in overseas markets was 30% of its total of 30 billion won ($ 25.41 million). Last month, it had 1.1 million pageviews in Taiwan.

“We are offering media companies trial service opportunities to compare it with content discovery platforms like Taboola, Outbrain and Popin, which ended up stealing them from our service,” said Kang Eun-jin, manager. public relations at Dable.

[Source: Dable]

[Source: Dable]

Jandi’s corporate messaging and collaboration tool has risen to the top in Taiwan, overtaking the Chinese messaging app WeChat.

Toss Lab, the Korean startup behind Jandi, derives 15% of its income from overseas. Since its launch in 2015, Jandi has been loved by more than 300,000 companies in 70 countries for its built-in workplace productivity features and messaging system tailored for Asian users. Unlike English-based Microsoft Teams, Jandi offers services in Taiwanese Mandarin and offers Taiwanese emoticons.

Artificial intelligence-based math tutoring app Qanda, developed by Korea-based Mathpresso, ranks first in 20 countries, including Vietnam and Indonesia, with 12 million monthly users in October. The app has gained explosive popularity thanks to easy-to-access online tutoring and has entered into a collaboration agreement with a publisher in Vietnam.

[Source: Toss Lab]

[Source: Toss Lab]

In Japan, the audio broadcasting platform Spoon Radio has achieved good results. Its monthly user count in October reached around 600,000, surpassing 400,000 from Clubhouse, the invitation-only social networking service that has captivated iPhone users. The company owes more than half of its turnover to Japan. The app expects greater penetration as rival live audio apps pull out of the country.

Vimosoft’s VLLO is ranked No. 1 in video editing applications in Japan with almost a third of its daily downloads coming from Japan. Vimosoft CEO Lee Kyung-hyun said his service designed for Japanese people who like to use stickers and leave space was a winning point.

By Na Hyun-joon and Lee Soo-min

[ⓒ Pulse by Maeil Business News Korea & mk.co.kr, All rights reserved]


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